EDUCATIONAL PLAY FOR PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN SUFFERING FROM TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS

  • Larisa Dumbravă
  • Amorin R. Popa
  • Daniela Bara
  • Dănuța Grebnișan
  • Floare Husar
  • Stuart Brink
Keywords: diabetes education, type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, toddlers, educational play

Abstract

Education is the keystone of diabetes care and management. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) provided clear evidence that successful intensification of management reduces microvascular complications. But intensification of management requires effective diabetes self-management, which requires frequent and high levels of educational input and continuous support ISPAD Consensus Guidelines for the Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and Adolescents recommends that every person with diabetes has a right to comprehensive expert practical education. Diabetes education should be delivered by health care professionals with a clear understanding of the special and changing needs of children and their families as they grow through the different stages of life. Diabetes education needs to be adaptable and personalized so that it should be appropriate to each individual’s age, stage of diabetes, maturity and lifestyle. It also needs to be culturally sensitive and at such a pace as to suit individual needs. Toddlers are totally dependent on parents/care providers for injections, food and monitoring. Also, hypoglycemia is more common and may be more severe in this stage of age. Education on prevention, recognition and its management is a priority. Diabetes education needs to be a continuous process and it should be repeated if we want it to be effective.

Published
2010-12-15
How to Cite
Dumbravă, Larisa, Amorin Popa, Daniela Bara, Dănuța Grebnișan, Floare Husar, and Stuart Brink. 2010. “EDUCATIONAL PLAY FOR PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN SUFFERING FROM TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS”. Romanian Journal of Diabetes Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases 17 (4), 259-64. https://rjdnmd.org/index.php/RJDNMD/article/view/357.
Section
Original Research Articles